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More Than 5 Million Travelers Expected for Thanksgiving Week

Some of us will be traveling this Thanksgiving, and some of us won't. For those of us who are planning on taking a flight, there are a few things you should know about air travel during this time period.



A record number of people are expected to travel this Thanksgiving, according to AAA.

AAA is predicting a record number of people will be traveling this Thanksgiving, and many of them will be flying.

According to a survey conducted by AAA, the majority of travelers are expected to drive, but more than 5 million people are expected to fly.

This year's travel forecast is based on data collected from AAA's travel membership in the past five years. The data shows that the average Thanksgiving driver will spend almost $116 per day on fuel and other costs associated with driving back and forth from their home to their destination over the holiday weekend (Nov 24-26).


The majority will be driving, but more than 5 million people are expected to fly.

While most people will be driving, more than 5 million are expected to fly. That's a 4 percent increase from last year, and airlines are having trouble keeping up with demand. The good news is that there are more seats available for Thanksgiving travel than there were for last year's holiday—but not by much. So if you're planning on flying this week, be sure to book your flight early so that you don't miss out on the flight of your dreams!


That's more than a 4 percent increase from last year.

That's a lot of people. But, if you're like me, you probably don't spend much time thinking about air travel during the holidays until you're stuck in an airport with dozens of other people. Or maybe your flight is delayed for hours or cancelled altogether and you have to wait for another one—or worse still, take a bus instead!

But here's the thing: airlines are looking to make as much money as possible over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend and they'll do whatever it takes (or so it seems) to get that revenue stream flowing. This can mean raising fares by as much as 120% or more than doubling them from what they were last year at this time!


We're seeing a lot of increase in demand for the holidays, and there are less seats in the market than last year, so fares are higher, says George Hobica of Airfare Watchdog.

We're seeing a lot of increase in demand for the holidays, and there are less seats in the market than last year, so fares are higher, says George Hobica of Airfare Watchdog.

"Airlines are trying to maximize revenue," he said. "They don't want to give up any seats."


So if you haven't booked your holiday travel yet, you'll find that it may cost you a pretty penny at the gate.

if you haven't booked your holiday travel yet, you'll find that it may cost you a pretty penny at the gate.

So if you don’t want to spend more than necessary on flights this Thanksgiving season (or any other time of year), here are some tips for finding cheap flight deals:


Those who were able to book their flights early say they got a deal.

“I was able to get a ticket for $300 round trip,” said Erin Devereaux, who booked her flight home to Texas on Thanksgiving Day.

She says she was happy that she had flexibility with when she could leave because it gave her more choice in flights and prices.

It's important to know that booking early doesn't guarantee you a better deal, but it does give you more time to find the best one. If you have specific plans for your trip back home or just want to take advantage of the cheapest airfare possible, then now is the time!


In general, most travelers planning an overseas trip look to book their flight around 10 weeks before departure, and domestic vacationers start looking about 2 months ahead of their trip.

In general, most travelers plan an overseas trip 10 weeks before departure, and domestic vacationers start looking about 2 months ahead of their trip.


Experts recommend booking ahead with as much flexibility as possible – unless you're going somewhere that has a high price tag on flights (like Hawaii).

  • You should book ahead if you want to save money.

  • Flexibility is key when booking flights, especially if you're traveling during peak travel times like Thanksgiving week. If you can't be flexible with your schedule, try to at least keep an eye on the weather forecasts in case they change suddenly and force an airline to cancel or delay flights.

More people will be traveling by air this Thanksgiving.

More people will be traveling by air this Thanksgiving. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, more than 2 million travelers will be flying during the holiday week. That's an increase from last year and marks another record high for US airlines' busiest travel period of the year.

While air travel remains popular, other modes of transportation are seeing a boost as well: car rentals are up 4% over last year; Amtrak trains are running at full capacity; buses are filling up faster than ever; and even cruise ship companies say they're seeing increased demand for their services with more than half a million passengers taking cruises during this time frame alone — an all-time high!




The good news is that there are still plenty of seats available. The bad news is that they may cost you more than last year. If you haven't booked your flight yet, don't wait until the last minute – but do start looking now!


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