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How long can you stay in Europe as a digital nomad?

Digital nomads are a growing group of individuals who use technology to work remotely while traveling the world. One popular destination for digital nomads is Europe, which offers a mix of culture, history, and modern amenities that make it an attractive place to live and work. However, as with any travel, there are certain rules and regulations that must be followed, including visa requirements. In this blog post, we'll explore how long you can stay in Europe as a digital nomad without a visa, and what options are available for those who want to stay longer.


First, it's important to note that the European Union (EU) is a single market made up of 27 member countries that have abolished passport and other types of border controls for travel within the EU. This means that as a digital nomad, you can travel freely within the EU for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This is known as the "Schengen area," named after the 1985 Schengen Agreement that established the rules for free movement within the EU.

The Schengen area includes the following countries:

  • Austria

  • Belgium

  • Czech Republic

  • Denmark

  • Estonia

  • Finland

  • France

  • Germany

  • Greece

  • Hungary

  • Iceland

  • Italy

  • Latvia

  • Liechtenstein

  • Lithuania

  • Luxembourg

  • Malta

  • Netherlands

  • Norway

  • Poland

  • Portugal

  • Slovakia

  • Slovenia

  • Spain

  • Sweden

  • Switzerland

While Switzerland is not a member of the EU, it is a member of the Schengen area. So, as a digital nomad, you can stay in any of these countries for up to 90 days without a visa. However, if you want to stay longer or visit countries outside the Schengen area, you'll need to apply for a visa.

One option for digital nomads who want to stay in Europe for longer periods of time is to apply for a long-term visa, such as a student visa or work visa. These visas allow you to stay in the country for an extended period of time, usually for the purpose of studying or working. However, these visas can be difficult to obtain, as they often require proof of enrollment in a school or job offer from a local employer.

Another option for digital nomads is to apply for a "digital nomad visa." While these visas are not yet widely available, they are being considered by several European countries as a way to attract talented professionals who can work remotely. For example, Estonia has a "digital nomad visa" that allows individuals to work and live in the country for up to a year. The visa requires that applicants have a valid passport and health insurance, and that they be able to prove that they have a stable income.


While digital nomad visas are a relatively new concept, they are likely to become more common in the coming years as more and more people opt for remote work. However, it's important to keep in mind that these visas may have specific requirements and may not be available in all countries.

Another option for digital nomads is to apply for a "temporary residence permit." These permits are usually issued for a specific purpose, such as studying or working, and allow you to stay in the country for an extended period of time. However, like long-term visas, these permits can be difficult to obtain and may require proof of enrollment in a school or job offer from a local employer.

While the Schengen area has abolished passport and other types of border controls for travel within the EU, some countries outside the EU may have their own visa requirements for digital nomads. For example, the United Kingdom is not a member of the Schengen area, and has its own visa requirements for those who want to visit or live in the country. If you're a digital nomad and want to visit or stay in the UK for longer than six months, you'll need to apply for a "Tier 5 Visa." This visa is specifically for individuals who are working or studying in the UK, and requires that you have a job offer or enrollment in a school before you can apply.

In summary, as a digital nomad, you can stay in the Schengen area for up to 90 days without a visa. If you want to stay longer, you can apply for a long-term visa, a digital nomad visa (if available), or a temporary residence permit. However, these options may have specific requirements and may not be available in all countries. It's important to research the visa requirements of the country you want to visit or stay in, and to plan ahead to ensure that you have the necessary documents and permissions before you travel.

HOWEVER have you ever pondered how other nomads are able to circumvent the 3-month restriction and remain on the European continent for extended periods of time? First off, there is absolutely no "bypassing." To extend their time in Europe, they are merely meticulously organizing their days both inside and outside the Schengen Zone.



Even if they are in Europe, stays in non-Schengen nations do not count toward the 90-day maximum. As you wait to be readmitted into the Schengen Area after the 90th day, you are permitted to visit 18 additional nations for periods of three months each. If you want to stay in Europe for a while, you can do it repeatedly without ever getting into trouble with the law.


In case you were wondering, these are the European countries that currently are not in Schengen:


  • Albania

  • Andorra*

  • Belarus

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina

  • Bulgaria

  • Cyprus

  • Georgia

  • Ireland

  • Kosovo

  • Monaco*

  • Moldova

  • Montenegro

  • North Macedonia

  • Romania

  • Russia

  • San Marino*

  • Serbia

  • Turkiye

  • United Kingdom (England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland)

  • Ukraine

  • Vatican City*

*Though these European states aren't formally part of Schengen, the laws nonetheless apply to them informally because they don't have border controls with the Schengen countries that border them (France and Italy). This means that any stays in Monaco, San Marino, or the Vatican City count against the 90-day restriction. While Andorra still enforces border checks with Spain and France, access from other Schengen countries is only available by land.


Some countries are much more hospitable than others, such as Albania and Georgia, which both let holders of U.S. passports to remain as tourists for a full year without requiring a visa, and the United Kingdom, where transient visitors are given a 6-month visa.


You now know that Europe is much more than just the Schengen states and that there are various methods to prolong your stay without breaking the law if you're searching for more variety and don't necessarily want to spend a complete year somewhere specific (while continuing to explore this History-packed continent). Moreover, without having to go through the hassle of visiting a Consulate to apply for a visa.


All things considered, Europe is a very popular destination for digital nomads, offering a mix of culture, history, and modern amenities that make it an attractive place to live and work.





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